The metronomes - a circuit like me - Metronome - Wikipedia


    The Wittner Taktell Mini metronome is the smallest keywound metronome available. The Witner Taktel mini metronome is very accurate and will last a long time with proper care. The Taktell Mini Wood model is identical to the plastic, but with a wood case finished in mahogany.  
   
    The keywound metronomes with a swinging pendulum let you see the motion of the beat. The bell models will also accent the first beat with a bell sound. The keywound models give the most natural sound of all the metronomes and are very pleasing to the ear. The Taktell Mini is a great metronome for portability, but the sound is louder on the Taktell Piccolo or Standard Models. Using the keywound models is simple and with winding the key about 8 -12 times the sound should last from 20 to 30 minutes. 
     

The patent for the metronome was entered in 1816: "John Malzl [sic], of Poland-street, Middlesex, Machinist; for an instrument . . which he denominates a Metronome, or musical time-keeper." The courts, however, later proved that the aforementioned Johann Maelzel copied a pendulum design of Dietrich Winkel, making Winkel the actual inventor. Nonetheless, Maelzel was the more successful marketer of the metronome and even has a notation named after him. The "." in notations like ". = 60" stands for "Maelzel's metronome" and indicates a tempo of 60 beats per minute or a beat per tick of the metronome as it ticks 60 times, in the case of our example. The name of the invention itself is based on the Greek words metron, meaning "measure," and nomos, meaning "law."

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The Metronomes - A Circuit Like MeThe Metronomes - A Circuit Like MeThe Metronomes - A Circuit Like MeThe Metronomes - A Circuit Like Me

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